fbq('track', 'ViewContent');
Showing posts with label scoot. Show all posts
Showing posts with label scoot. Show all posts

How Can I Keep My Active Students Learning?

 Kiddos sure have a hard time sitting for long periods of time, don't they?
 
According to research, they shouldn't! So how can we let them be active, yet keep them learning?
 
How Can I Keep My Active Students Learning? Here are three ideas to keep them moving AND learning, and even having some fun, too!
 

 Clearly, the answer is... have them learn standing up!


I've got a very active group of kids this year, so we've been learning in a variety of positions all year!

Here are some ways we can keep moving as part of their learning:

1. Have them move as part of the learning! For example, when we learn to spell a new word, the kids "dance" the words. For each tall letter, we stand tall with our hands in the air. For each medium sized letter, we put our hands on our hips. For the letters that go below the baseline, we squat with our hands on the floor. A couple of my students really enjoy the "dance" concept, and have added a hip movement as we spell and dance out the words. I'm all for making it more fun! 

2. Brain breaks! Sometimes children need a break FROM learning, and that's fine. But it's possible to add a physical break that's also part of the learning! For example, in math, the children could do "wall push ups" while counting by fives... or reciting math facts. When sharing a story with the children, the children can take a walk as if they were one of the characters in the story.

Here's a little freebie with some Social Studies and Science related Brain Breaks!


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Science-and-Social-Studies-Brain-Breaks-Freebie-1983266?utm_source=blog%20post%20on%20active%20students%20&utm_campaign=s%20and%20ss%20brain%20breaks


3. Scoot! Scoot is an active game where children move from desk to desk answering questions or performing tasks. It's fun to play any time of year, but I find it particularly necessary as we get to those last few weeks of school.  Here is a blog post explaining how to play Scoot.

 
How Can I Keep My Active Students Learning? Here are three ideas to keep them moving AND learning, and even having some fun, too!

Keeping these ideas in mind, I've made a couple of new resources! Each resource has an informational text with 10 text based questions, 4 text based sketches for drawing, and 6 text related brain breaks. These are perfect for Scoot, or simply as task cards for those kiddos that need to move. Explore the links below if you want more information!







 Keep those kiddos moving!


How Can I Keep My Active Students Learning? Here are three ideas to keep them moving AND learning, even at the end of the school year!

Active Students? Try Scoot!

Today I'm sharing a game that helped me through those last hectic weeks of school where the kiddos just couldn't concentrate on much of anything...Scoot!
 
Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!
 
All you need to play scoot is a set of task cards (I know we all have plenty of those!) an answer sheet, and some desks or tables.

In the picture above, we put the desks into a big square, which is perfect for scoot, but rows, tables, or sets of desks in any arrangement can work. You just need to set a pattern for movement.

The basis of the game:
  1. There is a numbered task card on each desk. 
  2. Students do the task card at their desk, and write their answer on the answer sheet.
  3. When the teacher calls "Scoot", the children all move to the next desk in the sequence, and do that task card.
  4. Children continue to "scoot" from desk to desk until all cards have been completed.
    Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!
After completion, I usually let the children self-correct while we go over the cards. (Self correcting with highlighters makes it more fun!)



Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!

For added fun for squirmy kids, replace one of the task cards with a brain break. My kids LOVE brain breaks, and look forward to that part of scoot!
Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!

If you're interested in task cards that work well with scoot, see THIS LINK.

Want to try it out with a freebie? Social Studies Review Task Cards


How do you keep your active students learning?

Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!

A Fun Way to Review Basic Information

If you're not familiar with the game of Scoot, it's time you learned! It can be played with any type of task card that would have a quick answer.  (There are other awesome types of task cards for skills that require more time and thinking, but that's not what Scoot is about!)  


A Fun Way to Review Basic Information: This is a great end-of-the-year, beginning of the year, or anytime game, with suggestions on how to use it.


Brain research suggests that including movement will help the brain function more efficiently. Scoot has the children moving from place to place, which not only gets the brain going, but it makes the whole thing more fun for the kids! Individual cards are placed throughout the classroom, and the children move from spot to spot, performing the task, recording the answer on their answer sheet, then moving onto the next card in the next part of the room when the teacher calls "Scoot"! After much scooting, the children return to their starting spot.

For more about how Scoot works, see THIS BLOG POST.


I've used these with small groups and large groups. Sometimes you can take a few cards, have a handful of kids scoot through those, and save the rest of the cards in the series for another day.

The kids love Scoot! It's a great way to add fun to a review that can be rather mundane, like parts of speech or vowel sounds.  Yet, these things need to be practiced so these skills are strengthened.

A couple of years ago, I spent some time making several sets of Task Cards that are perfect for Scoot playing. I've spent the last couple of days updating these sets.

First of all, there's my forever freebie, in honor of a young man we lost a couple of years ago. See THIS BLOG POST for more information about why this is a forever freebie.

Social Studies Review: Scoot or Task Cards is a collection of questions on mapping and general Social Studies knowledge.  It can be played as a Scoot game, or just individual task cards. I made it to review end of the year second grade skills, but have heard that it's great review for older children as well!  See the image below to download this freebie.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Task-Cards-for-Second-and-Third-Grade-Review-in-Social-Studies-250874?utm_source=Reviewing%20Blog%20Post&utm_campaign=SS%20Review

Another product in this series, Vocabulary Review: Scoot or Task Cards gives the children vocabulary practice and review with prefixes, suffixes, antonyms and synonyms. (See image for link.)

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Vocabulary-Task-Cards-Prefixes-Suffixes-Antonyms-Synonyms-and-Abbreviations-251032?utm_source=Reviewing%20Blog%20Post&utm_campaign=Vocab%20Review
 
 
Mathematics Review: Scoot orTask Cards reviews time, money, place value, measurement, story problems and fact families. (See image for link.)

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Task-Cards-for-Second-and-Third-Grade-Review-Math-250988?utm_source=Reviewing%20Blog%20Post&utm_campaign=Math%20Review


Language Review: Scoot or Task Cards practices parts of speech:  nouns, proper nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. (See image for link.)

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Task-Cards-for-Second-and-Third-Grade-Parts-of-Speech-Language-250927?utm_source=Reviewing%20Blog%20Post&utm_campaign=Language%20Review


Phonics Review: Scoot or Task Cards practice vowel sounds: short vowels, long vowels, r-controlled vowels, and vowel teams. (See image for link.)

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Task-Cards-for-Second-and-Third-Grade-Parts-of-Speech-Language-250927?utm_source=Reviewing%20Blog%20Post&utm_campaign=Phonics%20Review


Science Review: Scoot or Task Cards reviews all sorts of beginning science concepts: five senses, basic biology, chemistry, astronomy, plants, and weather.


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Science-Task-Cards-for-Second-and-Third-Grade-Review-251607?utm_source=Reviewing%20Blog%20Post&utm_campaign=Science%20Review


Plus, I have a set that bundles all 6 sets!  Combined Review- Word Work, Math, Science and Social Studies: Scoot or Task Cards gives you weeks worth of review activities for all subjects! This is a fun way to spend those last few weeks when the children just can't sit still and have lost their attention spans, or a great way to start the year, making sure they have the background knowledge they need.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Task-Cards-for-Fun-Review-in-Phonics-Language-Math-Science-and-Social-Studies-251035?utm_source=Reviewing%20blog%20post&utm_campaign=Combined%20Review

But there's even more good news: All these items are available digitally with Boom Learning!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Distance-Learning-Combined-Review-BOOM-Task-Cards-Bundle-3754002?utm_source=Reviewing%20blog%20post&utm_campaign=Combined%20Review%20Boom

 These are perfect for end of the year review, summer practice, or back to school reviewing basic concepts. They're appropriate for grades 2, 3, or 4!


A Fun Way to Review Basic Information: This is a great end-of-the-year, beginning of the year, or anytime game, with suggestions on how to use it.

Let the Games Begin!

We had the first day of our Academic Olympics today, and we all had a great time!
Let the games begin! This post tells about a great way to maintain academics at the end of the school year and have some fun by adding an Olympics theme. (It also works well in summer school.) Plus, there's a freebie!

We started with our Opening Ceremony first thing in the morning. The children were dressed in their country's color, and carried their banners and flags. I also had my teacher assistant carry the Olympic Torch and an Olympic flag. The countries lined up in alphabetical order, just like they will in July in London. I carried the American flag at the end of our parade, after all, that's where the "host nation" always goes. We marched up and down all the hallways. Many of the other students and teachers peeked out of their classrooms to wish us well.

When we got back to the room, we made a big circle with all the countries. Each academic athlete touched the Olympic flag while they recited the Olympic Oath and the Olympic Creed. (I copied these almost word for word from what they use at the Olympics, with a few slight changes. I added the word "academic" in front of sports, and I left out the part about performance enhancing drugs.)

After the Oath and the Creed, I had all academic athletes shake hands with each other and say the words: Let the games begin!

We held several contests today! The team events we had:
  • brainstorming
  • math puzzle 
  • banner design
  • reading endurance (they earned points for the team if they were focused on reading when I checked)
  • Group phonics scoot
Then we also had a couple of individual events:
  • reading with expression (Judged in 4 categories... volume, expression, clarity, and presentation)
  • math facts (both addition and subtraction)


Then we had medal ceremonies! I let the first place winners stand on chairs, and as that country's national anthem played, I placed medals around their necks. I still get all goose bumpy when I think of their faces as I placed the ribbons around their necks... they even did that little "head dip" to allow me to get the ribbon around them, and they picked it up and looked at it proudly, just as I've seen Olympic athletes do! (I'm a sucker for ritual, and the kids really loved it!)

Well, it was a VERY busy day, and we still have more tomorrow! I wanted to share a couple of papers I made up for my Olympics, just in case you get any inspiration for end of the year activities, or summer fun! Click the image or click HERE for your Academic Olympic Freebie!

Let the games begin! This post tells about a great way to maintain academics at the end of the school year and have some fun by adding an Olympics theme. (It also works well in summer school.) Plus, there's a freebie!
For a more complete resource, click HERE

Let the games begin! This post tells about a great way to maintain academics at the end of the school year and have some fun by adding an Olympics theme. (It also works well in summer school.) Plus, there's a freebie!

Let the games begin! This post tells about a great way to maintain academics at the end of the school year and have some fun by adding an Olympics theme. (It also works well in summer school.) Plus, there's a freebie!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format