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Showing posts with label activity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label activity. Show all posts

Speed Chatting!

Do you have a talkative group like I do? 

Speed Chatting: some children just need to talk, and here's a chance to let them talk without wasting class time. Perfect for Morning Meeting!

 Do you have kiddos that have so much to say they have trouble holding it in? 

Isn't it tough to find class time to let them get out what they want to say!

So I decided to try Speed Chatting. It works sort of like speed dating, without the dating part. 

I have the children make 2 circles. They partner off, and get a couple of minutes to talk! Then one of the circles shifts, and they have a new partner for chatting. They'll shift a few more times until they've had a several chances to talk.

Sometimes I give them a topic, and sometimes I let them choose whatever they want to talk about. 

Topics could be: 

  • Tell about the book you're reading.
  • Why do we need to regroup to subtract?
  • What did you do this weekend?
  • Talk about your favorite thing to do.
  • Tell what you know about _________.
  • Tell about a place you'd love to visit someday.
  • What pet do you wish you could have?
  • If you had plenty of money, what would you buy?
  • What is your favorite subject in school?
  • What do you wish you could have for homework?
  • What do you like to do after school?
  • What makes someone a good friend?
  • What is something you wish more people knew about you?
I'm sure you can think of plenty more!

Right after the holidays, the kiddos were busting at the seams, wanting to tell about their vacations, staying up until midnight on New Year's Eve, and their new toys.  

We did Speed Chatting. We had to... there was no option, they were going to talk about their vacations no matter what. They needed to get it out. Either they'd be sneaking it in all day, or I'd let them get it out of their systems first thing in the morning. 

I chose to put Speed Chatting into Morning Meeting that day. 
Then they were ready to get back to work!

Honestly, I don't think kids get enough time to speak their minds these days. We're incredibly busy between testing as well as teaching an overloaded curriculum. This is a nice way to get them talking without missing much class time.

Enjoy Speed Chatting with your students! 

You'll hear some amazing stories!


Speed Chatting: some children just need to talk, and here's a chance to let them talk without wasting class time. Perfect for Morning Meeting!

Be Prepared for Giggles!

Here's a group game that will bring out the giggles in everyone! 

 
 Be Prepared for Giggles! "True or False" is a fun activity that will send the children into fits of laughter!
It can be played at Morning Meeting, indoor recess, or any time of day. It's called True or False?

One person is "it". That person makes two statements. One is a true statement, the other is a false statement. It might sound something like this:  "I have an older brother. I have a baby sister." The others have to guess which is the fallacy.  It sounds so simple, but when the kids try to make up false statements, the giggles begin!

Usually, it's pretty easy to guess the false statement, but that's not really what it's about. It's really about the giggles! After all, a good laugh is healthy!
 
This game can easily be played in the classroom OR in a virtual learning experience. 
 
For more team building games see: 

Be Prepared for Giggles! "True or False" is a fun activity that will send the children into fits of laughter!

Be Prepared for Giggles! "True or False" is a fun activity that will send the children into fits of laughter!

 


Active Students? Try Scoot!

Today I'm sharing a game that helped me through those last hectic weeks of school where the kiddos just couldn't concentrate on much of anything...Scoot!
 
Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!
 
All you need to play scoot is a set of task cards (I know we all have plenty of those!) an answer sheet, and some desks or tables.

In the picture above, we put the desks into a big square, which is perfect for scoot, but rows, tables, or sets of desks in any arrangement can work. You just need to set a pattern for movement.

The basis of the game:
  1. There is a numbered task card on each desk. 
  2. Students do the task card at their desk, and write their answer on the answer sheet.
  3. When the teacher calls "Scoot", the children all move to the next desk in the sequence, and do that task card.
  4. Children continue to "scoot" from desk to desk until all cards have been completed.
    Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!
After completion, I usually let the children self-correct while we go over the cards. (Self correcting with highlighters makes it more fun!)



Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!

For added fun for squirmy kids, replace one of the task cards with a brain break. My kids LOVE brain breaks, and look forward to that part of scoot!
Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!

If you're interested in task cards that work well with scoot, see THIS LINK.

Want to try it out with a freebie? Social Studies Review Task Cards


How do you keep your active students learning?

Active Students? Try Scoot! The game, Scoot, can be played a number of ways for a variety of reasons. Here are the basics of the game, a few suggestions, and a freebie!

5 Days of Indoor Recess? 5 Ideas to Try!

No matter where you live, I'm sure you've had instances where the kiddos couldn't get outside to play. We've had snow, sleet, rain, and even wild animals keeping the children inside. And we all know how those kids (and adults) are when they can't get outside to play!

5 Days of Indoor Recess? 5 Ideas to Try: Here are some suggestions for those days when the children really need to get moving and shake things up!

Yet, we have to keep teaching! 

No worry, there are things that can be done to keep the children learning AND keep them from getting frustrated from lack of exercise.

Here are a five ideas:


1.  Transition! No matter how fascinating our lessons are, kids need to move their bodies.  Every time I notice them struggling to pay attention (about every 5-8 minutes according to research) I will change things up.  If they are at the rug, I'll have them go to their desks. If they're at their desks, we'll go to the rug. If they're at the reading table, I'll have them go get a book or a paper. Getting up to move grabs a few extra minutes to the lesson.

2. Brain Breaks! Sometimes a simple walk across the classroom isn't enough. They not only need to move, but they need to think about something else for a while! Playing imaginary basketball or playing the air guitar to a FUN song gives their brain as well as their body a change and a workout.  They get their blood moving as well as their imagination. 

3. Go Noodle! I'm sure you have heard of Go Noodle by now! My kiddos LOVE it! It is free (although you can pay for even more fun stuff) and there are numerous videos that are fun and get the kids moving. Most teachers who use it are in love with Go Noodle! (I admit, I'm one of them!)


4. Shake it Up! Although in a dream situation, the first week back after a break should be settling back into a schedule, that didn't happen for us this week. Usually I use the "shake it up" strategy when things have become stagnant and the kiddos need a change. Here are a few ways I shake things up without sacrificing classroom order and management:
 
  • Change their seats - they always love to see who their new "neighbors" are!
  • Reverse the schedule ( if your school allows)
  • Change the groupings 
  • Bring out a new set of books (my kids get so excited when I bring out new books!)
  • Start a whole new topic in Science or Social Studies

5. Glitter! When all else fails, bring out the glitter! Glitter not only makes a good incentive, but it's just plain cool! I brought out the glitter on Friday afternoon as a reward. After 5 days of indoor recess, they were still smiling, gave their all on the computer tests, and had learned 2 digit subtraction with regrouping! Now THAT is a great reason to bring out the glitter!

My kiddos had been working on goal setting for 2015 using THESE freebie foldables by Rachel Lamb.
5 Days of Indoor Recess? 5 Ideas to Try: Here are some suggestions for those days when the children really need to get moving and shake things up!

I think they needed glitter, don't you?

How do you survive after too much "inside" time?


5 Days of Indoor Recess? 5 Ideas to Try: Here are some suggestions for those days when the children really need to get moving and shake things up!

Area or Perimeter?

Ever notice how kids have a hard time keeping track of which meaning goes with the word "area" and which meaning goes with the word "perimeter"?

Area or Perimeter? Ever notice how kids have a hard time keeping track of which meaning goes with the word "area" and which meaning goes with the word "perimeter"? Here are some brain compatible tips!

My kids used to, but then I made up a couple of tricks that helped the kids remember which one was which. Brain research tells us that making these connections in the brain help children remember!


Area is measuring squares.  Both words have the are in them, which I emphasize when I teach it.  I also make a hand motion that reminds the children that we're talking about a full surface.


Perimeter measure around the sides. I emphasize that r in both words, and make a hand motion moving around.


You know, I'm kind of obnoxious about the way I repeat it over and over, making the same hand movements, and emphasize the are for area and the r in perimeter.


But I've had former students tell me they remembered the difference between area and perimeter and they repeated the movements I used to make when they were in my class.


I also made up this activity for the children to practice the differences between the two. See the image or HERE: Area or Perimeter

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Area-or-Perimeter-225468?utm_source=blog%20post&utm_campaign=Area%20or%20Perimeter

When my students do this activity, they repeat my gestures every time!


Area or Perimeter? Ever notice how kids have a hard time keeping track of which meaning goes with the word "area" and which meaning goes with the word "perimeter"? Here are some brain compatible tips!

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