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Showing posts with label morning meeting greeting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label morning meeting greeting. Show all posts

25 Alternatives to Handshakes

I always took pride in teaching my students the proper way to complete a handshake. After all, shaking hands is a life skill, isn't it? Well, probably not any more! But we still need to greet each other!
Building community in the classroom involves interactions.
 
Children (and adults) need to greet each other each day. The skill of positive interactions is one I am proud to teach because it is one they will need for the rest of their lives.

I think we can agree, handshakes are out. But there are parts to the handshake that have value: a moment of "connection," eye contact, a greeting, and a respect for the other person.

I've come up with a list of 25 different greetings that students can do as part of a morning greeting, and end of school meeting, or simply saying hello to their teacher in the morning. Plus, they can be done in online meetings as well!

Here they are:

#1: Give the peace sign!

#2: Give each other heart hands!

#3: Give air hugs!
25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#4: Share a squirt of hand sanitizer!

#5: Wave!
25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#6: Smile with your eyes!

#7: Jazz hands!

25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#8: Give each other a salute!

#9: Do a "One Second" Dance!

25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#10: Raise your eyebrows!

#11: Do two claps!

#12: Throw your hands in the air!

25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#13: Blow air kisses!

#14: Do a fist pump!

25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#15: Give the "Sup" nod!

#16: Give a thumbs up!

25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#17: Make a heart with your hands!

#18: Give the "Live Long and Prosper" signal from Star Trek!
25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#19: Give "air" high fives!

#20: Place your hand on your heart!

#21: Namaste!
25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

#22: Bow to each other!

#23: Wink at each other!

#24: Give each other the home alone face! (Without really touching your face, of course!)

25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.

 and #25: Have your class make up your own greeting!

Well there, now you have 25 ways to start or end your day that can be used in a socially distant classroom or during remote learning!

Here are some other ways to build community and team work in the classroom:



25 Alternatives to Handshakes: Greeting classmates is an important part of bonding as a class and building relationships.
 

Answering in Complete Sentences

Getting students to answer questions in complete sentences is no easy task, is it?
 
Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.

 



Here are some hints on making it easier on the kids! 
Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.
Let's say the question is "What is your favorite food?" 
Teach them how to use the words from the question to start off their answer. 
"My favorite food is..."

Another question could be, "How can you show kindness?" 
"I can show kindness by..."

Or perhaps you could ask, "How could you help someone who forgot his lunch?"
"I could help someone who forgot his lunch by..."

Here's one more example: "What animal would NOT make a good pet?"
"An animal that would NOT make a good pet is..."

It's important they get plenty of opportunities to hear this process before they go to the next step.
Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.
Now they need to get more involved! Instead of just hearing it, they need to practice orally.

I find this works well as a whole group, as in Morning Meeting. Ask one question to the group, and have each student tell their answer in complete sentences, using words from the question to start their answers. 

It's a good idea to review how they'll be starting their answers:
"My favorite food is..."
"I can show kindness by..."
"I could help someone who forgot his lunch by..."
"An animal that would NOT make a good pet is..."

As they are practicing, make sure the questions are interesting and fun, so they will be more interested in sharing their answers! (Plus, it's fun for the rest of us to hear their answers!)

Be sure to compliment those who elaborate on their answers, rather than simply one or two words. This is our end goal!

"My favorite food is spaghetti."
or
"My favorite food is spaghetti, with meatballs and lots of cheese on top."

"I can show kindness by helping."
or
"I can show kindness by helping someone who doesn't understand their math, or gets hurt on the playground."

"An animal that would NOT make a good pet is an elephant."
or
"An animal that would NOT make a good pet is an elephant because it would cost too much to feed it, and it wouldn't fit in my room!"

See what I mean?
Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.
Here's where you add the paper! 

Here's my little trick: have them meet with a friend and tell what they're going to write, word for word! Seriously, if they are going to write the language, they need to be able to speak it first! In fact, when they're first starting this skill, I might have them meet with a few partners before they sit down with the paper. (This is a trick I use with many aspects of writing... tell it first!)

I usually make a point to meet with a few children that I anticipate might struggle with this. 

Once I get those "strugglers" going, I'll check in with others to keep them on track.

Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.
Once they're ready, it's time for them to practice this skill without the guidance. It's a great way to start the day: post a question for the day, and have them answer it in complete sentences while you take attendance and lunch count.

It's still a good idea to have them practice orally with a friend before writing. 

Then, after they've written, sharing is encouraged!

Going back to revise after sharing is also encouraged!

Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.
I find the best way to encourage children to answer questions fully is to share the best ones. I'll go through the papers, find some that are well done, and share those to the whole class. I make sure I choose several different examples that show a variety of ways to answer.

Are you ready to start asking questions? 
I happen to have plenty of questions, based on fun daily holidays:
 
 
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Morning-Meeting-Greeting-Activities-for-the-Whole-Year-4209589?utm_source=blog%20post%20Answering%20in%20Complete%20Sentences&utm_campaign=Daily%20Calendar%20Questions%20for%20the%20year


Each month is also available separately:

 
Plus, these make great backgrounds for virtual learning!

Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.




Answering in Complete Sentences: This post shares 5 steps to get the children to use words from the question to answer in complete sentences. Plus, several examples, and ideas for resources.


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