fbq('track', 'ViewContent');
Showing posts with label literacy games. Show all posts
Showing posts with label literacy games. Show all posts

5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words

I've been fascinated by the brain for years now. I have been reading quite a bit about how the brain works and the best ways to help children learn. 


5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

There are basically two types of words for the children to learn. One kind is based on letter sound relationships and letter patterns. In other words, they can be "sounded out." The other kind of word can't be "sounded out" and must be learned by the way it looks: by sight! These suggestions are to help with sight words. 

Here are some brain strategies that are easy to implement into the classroom to help the kiddos remember those important sight words.
5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

Practice makes permanent! When the children practice a little bit each day, it will help them remember. It's also a good idea to introduce small amounts at a time. If they need to know the first 100 Sight Words, only give them 10 at a time, then slowly adding on as they master those. Going through their pile of sight words for 5 minutes every day is more valuable than once a week for 30 minutes. Remember when you were in college and cramming for an exam? It didn't work so well, did it. (But somehow we got through it!)

5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

Exercise brings oxygen to the brain, and helps the brain become more receptive to learning. We all know that sitting still for too long makes for cranky, wiggly children (and adults!) Experts say bodies to move every 20 minutes. Bodies of children need to move more frequently than that! A quick walk, a little yoga, or a nice stretch are perfect Brain Breaks for little learners.
5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

 Emotions play a big role in memory. If you make it fun, they're more likely to remember. Games make learning fun! A little healthy competition gets the pulse moving and the emotions rolling. It really makes a difference!
5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

Brains are visual! Brains remember colors and other visuals, like cute little pictures. Use color when making word lists or word cards. You can use a variety of colors, but make sure they can be easily read. Make sure the words are appealing for the children.

5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

Experts recommend sight words be practiced in phrases rather than in isolation. Words in isolation don't have much meaning to the children, and brains need meaning. Three or four words in phrases have a lot more meaning and are more likely remembered by growing brains.

I do have some sight word phrases that follow these suggestions. You can find them HERE.


5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

There are built in Brain Breaks.


5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

There are color coded word cards, if desired, with "cute pictures."


5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.
There are plenty of color coded phrase cards, again with "cute pictures." The different colors on the borders correspond to the Fry Sight Word level.

5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

There's also a game that can be used to practice the words or phrases! The pictures correspond to the pictures on the individual cards. Each level of words is compatible with the game board, so it's easy to differentiate.

5 Tricks to Help Them Remember Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.

The game board and cards are easily stored in ziplocks!
 

What are your tricks to help them remember sight words?


Sight Words: based on brain research, here are 5 different strategies to help little readers remember sight words.




Organizing Literacy Centers

I work with 2 of my 3 reading groups daily. What do I do with my other students?

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

Many teachers use the Daily 5, and have some great ways to organize the 5 choices.


My district has some specific guidelines on how we spend our reading time, but we can be flexible within those guidelines.


Every child must have Independent Reading daily.  That's easy! Reading groups need to meet so many times per week, with the lowest group meeting daily.


I use little cards with magnets on the back. At the beginning of the year, I teach the children the meaning of each card, and introduce them one at a time. We start with Independent Reading, then move on to the others.


Some people call these Centers, or Learning Centers. I call them Stations. I don't know why!


I have a section of my whiteboard in the front of the room that's always about literacy stations. On some days, it might look like this:

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

The children know that the first row of cards tells where the children go for the first station.  In my classroom, instead of "Group 1, Group2, and Group 3", I have the children's individual names on magnets.  I do change my groups often, depending on the needs of my students.  
I also have one child starred per group, per day. The starred child is in charge of handing out pillows for Independent Reading.  (I try to make this time as special as possible... who doesn't love curling up with a comfy pillow and a good book?)
In the above picture, for the first station, I'm working with Group 1, while Group 2 does word work, and Group 3 has Independent Reading. After a while, I switch the groups, and I'll have 2 groups at Independent Reading while I work with the third group.

Or it might look something like this.

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!
In the red example, I work with Group 1, while Group 2 has Independent Reading.  Group 3 has their reading time at the Library. Later, I work with Group 3, while Group 2 has Independent Reading and Group 2 works at assigned computer activities.

On a day where I have to work with individuals, it might look like this, where I only teach one reading group.

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

For the first station, I work with Group 2 while Group 1 has Partner Reading and Group 3 has Independent Reading.  Later, I have 2 groups at Independent Reading and Group 3 has a written reading assignment. This is the time I would pull individuals for reading or writing conferences.

Here's a little freebie with some of the cards I use:
Literacy Center Cards Freebie

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

If you like this freebie, you might enjoy this full set of Guided Reading Management

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Guided-Reading-and-Literacy-Center-Management-Resources-1988356?utm_source=reading%20centers%20blog%20post&utm_campaign=literacy%20center%20management%20system

How do you organize your students for reading?


How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

Hanukkah Game Board

Looking for a little something to help your kids celebrate Hanukkah. This game can be used in many ways in the classroom!

Hanukkah Game Board Freebie: Want to bring a bit of Hanukkah into your classroom? Download this freebie, which can be used to practice any skill!

Brain research tells us that frequent repetition helps bring information from the short term memory to the long term memory. (Rather than "Practice Makes Perfect", I prefer "Practice Makes Permanent"!)  

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1t5NXX3hqyClqbHUfe9IkyVyzceiYT-Zl/view?usp=sharing

I use board games like this to practice sight words, math facts, sentence fluency, task cards, or any skill that needs practicing! The children just roll one die, but before they can move their place marker that many spaces, they have to perform a task. I sometimes have a selection of cards the children can choose from, and sometimes I have a specific skill for them to practice. Here are some ideas for practice cards: Practice Card Bundle, Word Work Bundle, or Reading Celebration Game.

Just click this link to download your Hanukkah Game Board Freebie!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Hanukkah-Two-Syllable-Nonsense-Word-Game-428155?utm_source=hanukkah%20blog%20post&utm_campaign=Hanukkah%20Two%20syllable%20nonsense%20words


Hanukkah Game Board Freebie: Want to bring a bit of Hanukkah into your classroom? Download this freebie, which can be used to practice any skill!

Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups

One of the toughest thing about being a classroom teacher is keeping those other kids occupied engaged and learning, so I can teach reading groups.  Here are some of the things I have my students work on while I'm teaching groups:

Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups: It can be tricky to find activities that will keep them engaged and learning, but not distracting to others. Here are some ideas!

Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups: It can be tricky to find activities that will keep them engaged and learning, but not distracting to others. Here are some ideas!1.  Independent Reading  This is the most important one! They do need to read daily, and it should be books at their level. My students browse for books from our classroom library, and keep books in book bags for independent reading time. I also let them relax with pillows. I try to make Independent Reading the best part of the day... it should be! See this post for more about my Independent Reading: Relax and Read!

2.  Reading Response There are so many ways for children to respond to reading. They can draw a picture of characters, write about connections, or perhaps do a variety of reading response activities that are out there!  Check out Teachers Pay Teachers or Pinterest... you'll find a ton of ideas, much of it is free!

3. Read With a Partner This is very motivational for the children, and I sometimes use it instead of Independent Reading. They do love anything social!
4.  Independent Writing  We do have Writer's Workshop nearly every day, but some of the children really love some time to get some writing done during reading group time. Since writing is usually at the very end of the day, they tend to be more productive when they get a slot of time for writing in the morning. It's a win - win! Here's a freebie that mine have always found super motivating: ABC Book.

5.  Word Work This is an opportunity to work those phonics skills!  I tend to keep my word work connected to skills and patterns that we are working on in the reading program, but many of my students also need lots of review on short and long vowels, rhyming words, word families, and, of course, sight words.  There are plenty of resources out there, or make your own! My students love to use their whiteboards, letter tiles, and manipulatives for their word work. Click the images below for links to Amazon. (Affiliate links.)

Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups: It can be tricky to find activities that will keep them engaged and learning, but not distracting to others. Here are some ideas!
Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups: It can be tricky to find activities that will keep them engaged and learning, but not distracting to others. Here are some ideas!
Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups: It can be tricky to find activities that will keep them engaged and learning, but not distracting to others. Here are some ideas!

6.  Literacy Games  Literacy games can include word work, comprehension skills, grammar practice, developing vocabulary or any combination of these. Again, adding that social component motivates the children. Games are such a great opportunity to practice skills, and they keep the children engaged and happy! Here are a few my students have enjoyed: Word Work Games.

7.  Task Cards  Task cards can practice work work, comprehension skills, grammar skills, thinking skills, or even social studies or science! You can make your own or use task card you've found. Here are some ideas: Combined Review Task Cards.


8. Read with a Teacher Assistant or Parent Volunteer I do have few little ones with very short attention spans or just need a little more guidance. These children really benefit from reading with an adult. The adults are encouraged to stop and chat about the story and encourage understanding as well as enjoyment.

9. Practice Handwriting Skills Sometimes they just have to focus on making the letters touch the lines in the right places! We are lucky enough to have Handwriting workbooks, but any paper will do! They can even practice handwriting skills on whiteboards or chalkboards.

10. Practice Spelling Words The children love practicing their words with a partner on their white boards. They look out for each other and the whiteboards are very forgiving. For other spelling ideas, see this resource: Spelling Task Cards.

What do your students do while you're teaching reading groups?

Ten Things for Students to do While You're Teaching Reading Groups: It can be tricky to find activities that will keep them engaged and learning, but not distracting to others. Here are some ideas!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format