fbq('track', 'ViewContent');
Showing posts with label extravert. Show all posts
Showing posts with label extravert. Show all posts

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom

 In the mid 1980s I took the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality test and found out I was an ISFJ.

That stands for: Introverted/ Sensing/ Feeling/ Judging. 

That's my personality type. It took me a while, but after a lot of research, I grew to understand and appreciate what it all means, and who I am.

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

The part I struggled with the most? The introverted part. I guess I just didn't understand what an introvert is. I knew I enjoyed my time with people, so I must be an extrovert, right?

Then I realized I was stuck on myths and didn't quite understand what those words meant.  

 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Here Are Some MYTHS About Introverts:

  • Introverts are shy.
  • Introverts want to be alone.
  • Introverts are anti-social.
  • Introverts are quiet.
  • Introverts don't take risks.
  • Introverts don't like fun.
  • Introverts are hard to get to know.

Here Are Some MYTHS About Extroverts:

(Note: Sometimes this is spelled extravert. Either spelling is acceptable.)
  • Extroverts love to talk.
  • Extroverts are happier than introverts.
  • Extroverts are more confident.
  • Extroverts don't listen.
  • Extroverts are loud.
  • Extroverts are "attention hogs."
  • Extroverts are the "life of the party."
  • Extroverts don't experience anxiety.
  • Extroverts never need "alone time" 
  • Extroverts are easy to get to know 
There is some truth to most of these statements about introverts and extroverts, but there is a whole lot more to these stories!
 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Here Are Some TRUTHS About Introverts:

  • Introverts are quickly drained by social interaction.
  • Introverts enjoy alone time.
  • Introverts are good listeners.
  • Introverts are reflective.
  • Introverts are observers.
  • Introverts prefer small groups or one-on-one to large groups 
  • Introverts prefer to think things through before talking or acting.
  • Introverts take longer to make decisions.
  • Introverts like time with friends, but prefer to do it on own terms.
  • Introverts experience anxiety about making phone calls.
  • Introverts prefer to write rather than talk.
  • Introverts have difficulty with multitasking and adjusting to a constantly changing environment.
  • Introverts need quiet to concentrate.
  • Introverts can be perceived as "stand-offish" or even "snobby,"
  • Introverts don't like being the center of attention, but don't want to be ignored.

Here Are Some TRUTHS About Extroverts

  • Extroverts don't mind being the center of attention, and often love it.
  • Extroverts take well to networking.
  • Extroverts show feelings easily.
  • Extroverts love to talk.
  • Extroverts prefer to talk through problems.
  • Extroverts make quick decisions.
  • Extroverts prefer to work with background noise.
  • Extroverts get bored when alone for long periods.
  • Extroverts acts before thinking.
  • Extroverts feel energized and inspired by socializing.

 Now Here's One BIG Truth About Introverts and Extroverts:

 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

It's a scale! No one is completely introverted or completely extroverted!

We all draw from both sides!

Sometimes people use the term "ambiverts" for people who fall near the middle of the scale. I prefer not to use that term because pretty much everyone shows indicators of both preferences at some point. However, most people lean more toward one preference or the other.

Here's a quote from THIS article that explains it well:

"Extroversion and introversion refer to where people receive energy from. Extroverts are energized by socializing in larger groups of people, having many friends, instead of a few intimate ones while introverts are energized by spending time alone or with a smaller group of friends

The big takeaway: It’s not how you act but what situations you thrive in and get energy from." 

 

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Well-Known Introverts

  • Bill Gates
  • Mark Zuckerberg
  • J.K. Rowling
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Meryl Streep
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Emma Watson
  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • Elton John
  • Lady Gaga
  • Audrey Hepburn
  • Albert Einstein
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
 Well-Known Extroverts
  • Oprah
  • Tom Hanks
  • Steve Jobs
  • Bill Clinton
  • Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Jim Carrey
  • Madonna
  • Winston Churchill
  • Ben Franklin
  • Beyonce 
 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Believe it or not, I recently read this information (in THIS article) that shows a significant difference in how brains react.

"Introvert brains react differently to dopamine than extrovert brains do. That's a chemical that turns on the reward- and pleasure-seeking part of your brain. Introverts and extroverts have the same amount of the chemical, but extrovert brains get an excited buzz from their reward center. Introverts, on the other hand, tend to just feel run-down by it."

I've been studying this stuff since the 80s, and this really explains WHY we have these personality differences! We're chemically different!

I suspect by now you've thought about which side of the scale you fall upon, as well as your students. One thing to be careful about: when introverts are comfortable with someone, they'll become quite chatty! Don't let that lead you to believe they're extroverted! (Many people have confused me with being an extrovert because I become passionate about certain things, like brain research, and won't stop talking about it!) 

There are plenty of introverts as well as extroverts in your classroom. (Studies show it's close to 50-50.) It's impossible to cater to all their needs, all the time. (Nor is it in their best interest.) But here are some suggestions for supporting each preference and helping them be successful in your classroom.

 

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Suggestions to Support the Introverts in Your Classroom:

  • Make sure there are "quiet" times in your classroom.
  • Give them time to think before they are expected to talk.
  • Know their interests and passions and encourage these.
  • Be sure to have one-on-one time with these students.
  • Post a daily schedule and stick to a routine so they'll know what's coming up.
  • Do "Reader's Theater" or a class play. (Believe it or not, many introverts shine with these genres!)
  • Make sure there are places where they can be by themselves. (nooks and crannies)
  • Help them work to develop friendships. (This is very difficult for introverts!)
  • Use notes or email for communication.
  • Remember, introverts get lonely, too! Make sure they have interactions with others and an opportunity to bond with classmates. Just keep it on a small scale!

 

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Suggestions to Support the Extroverts in Your Classroom:

In general, most classrooms are designed for extroverts. (Just look at the amount of students in the room!)
  • Give them plenty of opportunities to talk.
  • Let them "call out" sometimes, without require raising hands.
  • Give choices: work alone, with a partner, with a group.
  • Give choices: oral report, written report.
  • Allow for group discussions on what they're learning and books they've read.
  • Be flexible with the schedule.
  • Embrace them. 
 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs
 

Suggestions to Support the All Students in Your Classroom:

  • Share information about introversion and extroversion and help them understand who they are. Make sure they know they are an important part of the classroom!
  • Include Morning Meeting in your day, and make it clear that this is a safe place.
  • Be a role model, verbalizing your respect for the differences in students. Show that you celebrate those differences. 
  • When setting up your classroom, include areas for large groups, small groups, and individuals. Let children use them all.
  • Give choices: work alone, with a partner, with a group.
  • Give choices: oral report, written report.
  • Give choices: read with a partner, read alone. 
  • Touch base with all students daily, whether it be a group conversation, a one-on-one conversation, or just a quick not. They all need you.
  • Don't hesitate to challenge them by going out of their comfort zone, but only a bit. (We don't want to traumatize them!)
  • Embrace them for who they are. Celebrate who they are. Enjoy who they are. 

Years ago, I did a series of posts about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types, which I learned about during my Masters program. Here's a post about Introversion and Extroversion:

Myers-Briggs Part 2: How Do You Find Your Energy?

 
The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator Part 2: How do you find your energy?

When I grew to truly understand what an introvert is, I grew to be proud of who I am. Unfortunately, this didn't happen until I was in my 30s. Hopefully, our children will learn who they are an appreciate themselves at a much younger age!

 

The Final Lesson:

All types need each other! 

 

Introverts become artists, writers, architects, librarians, psychologists, scientists, chefs, ITs, journalists, and accountants. 

 
Extroverts become managers, real estate agents, lawyers, politicians, salespeople, managers, event planners, nurses, life coaches, and human relations specialists.

Don't we need ALL these people? Of course, since most people fall closer to the middle of both preferences, our children really can be anything we want to be!

And I've known many, many teachers who fall under both preferences who are highly successful!

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs


Myers-Briggs Part 2: How Do You Find Your Energy?

Last week I posted about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. (See THIS post.) 


Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy -Introversion or Extraversion?

This week I want to tell more about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. As I mentioned last time, there are four "scales". Today's scale asks how you find your energy.  

There are two ways people get their energy:  

1.  They get their energy from other people. (Extroversion)
2.  They get their energy by turning inward. (Introversion)

When I originally took the test, I really struggled over this one. I thought being an introvert meant I was anti-people. I thought it meant I was doomed to be alone, and I really questioned the accuracy of this scale. After all, I like people! I have a lot of great friends!

To some people, being an introvert can mean "terribly shy" or "prefers to be alone".  

For the Myers-Briggs scale, it doesn't mean that at all.  
  • Introverts prefer small groups of people to large groups.
  • Extroverts prefer large groups of people to small groups.
  • Introverts "recharge" by spending time alone.
  • Extroverts "recharge" by surrounding themselves with friends.
  • Introverts think, then act.
  • Extroverts act, then think.
  • Introverts are very reflective.  
  • Extroverts are very social.
  • Introverts feel drained after a social get together, even if they had fun.
  • Extroverts feel energized after a social get together.
  • When extroverts get together, they all talk at once.
  • When introverts get together, they take turns and speak one at a time
These last two comments remind me of the two staff rooms in my school, and the groups of people who have lunch in each room. Being an introvert, I go to the "quieter" staff room for lunch. It's a smaller group, and there is one conversation going on in the room. We all take turns and listen to each other. The other staff room has several conversations going on at once.They are clearly having a great time in there, but I can honestly say, the days I've gone in there, I was so drained I could barely go back to my classroom and face the afternoon with the kids! That's just not how I "regroup"!

I think what I've learned most about personality types is that our society needs all types. I've learned to value who I am and appreciate the other types. I've come to recognize the different types in other adults as well as the students I work with. Life would be boring if we were all the same! 


Some famous introverts:  Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Theresa, George Washington, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Julia Roberts, Audrey Hepburn, Johnny Carson, J.K.Rowling, Mozart, Steven Spielberg 

Some famous extroverts:  Oprah, Martin Luther King, Ben Franklin, Winston Churchill, Andrew Carnegie, Margaret Thatcher, John Kennedy, Bill Gates, Aristotle, Mark Twain, Anne Frank, Ronald Reagan

Great jobs for introverts: Accountant, Software Engineer, Market Research Analyst, Graphic Designer, Translator, Writer, Fine Arts, Designer, Chef, Scientist, Editor, Mechanic, Truck Driver, Lawyer, Teacher

Great jobs for extroverts: Emergency Medical Technician, Dental Hygienist, Physical Therapist, Public Relations Manager, Human Resource Specialist, Sports coach, Event planner, Corporate Fund Raiser, Hairdresser, Customer Service, Nurse, Financial Advisor, Teacher

Check out these book recommendations by exploring the images. (These are affiliate links,) Type Talk is the one I bought when I first learned about Myers Briggs Personality Types, and it has helped me understand people in all parts of my life.  


The second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy Introversion or Extroversion?     The second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy Introversion or Extroversion?     The second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy Introversion or Extroversion?
           

Here are links to all my posts on the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator:



Myers-Briggs Part 2: How Do You Find Your Energy - the second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy -Introversion or Extroversion?



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format