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Showing posts with label brain activity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label brain activity. Show all posts

Did You Know...? Writing vs Typing

Did you know... there are big differences that happen in the brain while writing as opposed to typing on a keyboard?

Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

There have been studies on what goes on in the brain while writing by hand as opposed to typing, and the differences are amazing!

Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

Writing something down actually helps you remember it! Students who take notes by hand are more likely to remember what they're learning as opposed to typing notes. The actual formation of letters activates parts of the brain that typing just doesn't activate!

Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

Writing becomes more holistic when writing by hand. It involves several different movements in the hands, touching different parts of the brain, rather than just pressing a button on a keyboard. 
 
Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.
 
Most people can type almost as fast as they can talk. That means if they're taking notes, they'll be typing pretty much everything they hear. If they're taking notes by hand, they can't write down everything, so they need to think about what the key information is, and how to quickly paraphrase what they're hearing. This causes more thinking, engaging the brain rather than just typing whatever they hear!

Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.
 
Seriously, the physical act of writing activates parts of the frontal lobe, which is responsible for expressive language and for managing higher level executive functions. It should be an active part of the students' day, shouldn't it?

Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

Various studies have shown that children who learn to write by hand also learn to read faster and show more creativity. Writing by hand not only increases focus, but encourages writers to use more interesting vocabulary and write more adventurous stories.
 
Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.
 
This doesn't mean give up all the electronics! They clearly have their place in the classroom and in the workplace!
 
Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

Despite the advantages of writing by hand, working on a keyboard is also a skill that needs to be developed and strengthened. They still need to be able to type efficiently and compose at the computer. It's not going away!
 
Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

This skill won't go away either. Plus, the kiddos absolutely LOVE learning cursive writing! Even though many districts are phasing out instruction in cursive, they can learn it on their own using this self-directed collection:  

Here are links to a couple of articles for more information:
16 Powerful Benefits of Writing by Hand
12 Reasons Why Handwriting is Important 
Handwritten Notes or Laptop Notes: A Skeptic Converted?
 
Plus here's one of my own that might interest you!
7 Benefits of Teaching Handwriting 
Seven Benefits of Teaching Handwriting: Despite handwriting not being a "tested skill," here are seven reasons why students benefit from writing instruction. 
  The brain is a fascinating thing, isn't it?
Lots of research has been done investigating how writing by hand affects brain functions compared to typing on a keyboard.

 

Three Quick Math Brain Activities

There are lots of quick things teachers can do to activate the brain while teaching math.  Remember, the brain needs movement and active engagement in order to activate those dendrites.  
Three Quick Math Brain Activities: Here are three quick ideas for getting children to think about math, while keeping the brain engaged.


Keeping things fun along with social interactions are putting the brain in the best place for learning to happen.  Here are some tricks I use.
  1. Skip Count beanie toss:  Skip counting is big in second grade.  Beanie babies are huge in my class.  Pairs of children pick up a beanie and start counting.  The children say a new count every time they catch the beanie.  They keep going as high as they can until time is up.  This could be done with Math facts, too!
  2. Musical Math Facts:  Work in groups of 4 or 5.  Put one less fact card on the desk or table.  As the music starts, they walk around the table.  (Dancing is optional!)  Works just like musical chairs, but when the music stops, each child picks up a math fact.  The last person to say the correct answer to his/ her fact becomes the "cheerleader".  (I use cheerleader rather than loser, as I insist they say positive things to their classmates, even if they're out.  I always remind the boys that, in my class, "cheerleader" doesn't mean wearing a short skirt and shaking pom poms, it means supporting their team mates.)  I like to have several groups going at once, since more kids are practicing more frequently, and it goes more quickly.  The teacher can keep an eye on those kids that need more guidance. 
  3. Calendar March:  My students need to practice the days of the week and the months of the year until they know them by heart.  From their desk position, they all chant the months of the year and march in any direction.  (Of course, I remind them to keep their distance from furniture and people.)  Then I challenge them to find their way back to their seat by marching to the Days of the Week. 



Of course, feel free to adapt any of these ideas to your own grade level.  I use most of these as a warm up at the beginning of math, or as a break to keep the brain focused.



Of course, these three activities can be adapted for anything that needs to be reinforced.  Rather than skip counting, math facts, or days of the week, try the same activities for some other subjects.  Here are some ideas
  • Spelling:  practicing their spelling words, or "igh" family words
  • Reading:  Name all the characters in today's story, or tell the main events in sequential order
  • Social Studies"  Name the 7 continents, or name as many states as you can
The possibilities are endless.  And this is only the beginning of Brain Based Learning in the classroom!

Three Quick Math Brain Activities: Here are three quick ideas for getting children to think about math, while keeping the brain engaged.

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