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Showing posts with label addition. Show all posts
Showing posts with label addition. Show all posts

Seven Steps to a Happy Last Day of School - Part 3: Playing Cards

Are you going crazy trying to get it all done?


Keep Out a Few Decks of Playing Cards! This post includes a fun addition game resource to play with playing cards!


If you're like me, you want to enjoy that last day with the students. I've got 7 steps I take on that last day. Today is about Step 3.

You can read about Step One here:  Read Your Favorite Book.

You can read about Step Two here: Leave Out a Few Favorite Games

Here is the third Strategy:

Keep Out a Few Decks of Playing Cards! This post includes a fun addition game resource to play with playing cards!
If you're anything like me, you have a TON of math games, but it's ok to pack those up, since there are several games that can be played with a simple deck of cards!

Keep Out a Few Decks of Playing Cards! This post includes a fun addition game resource to play with playing cards!

Here are some easy card games they can play to review important math skills:


1. Addition War (Like regular war, but with 2 cards added together.)

2. Multiplication War (Like Addition War, but with the cards multiplied together.)

3. Salute This is one of my favorite games (and the kids, too!) I learned about it HERE. You can download a freebie with directions to the addition version as well as the multiplication version on this website.

4. Twenty-One Some people know this game as Blackjack, but this is the "non-gambling" version. This game requires addition skills as well as some strategy and thinking about probability. The children absolutely love this one! You can download directions for playing the game here: Twenty-One.

Keep Out a Few Decks of Playing Cards! This post includes a fun addition game resource to play with playing cards!

5. Solitaire I know, this doesn't have a specific math skill, but it sure does strengthen their Number Sense!

I'd love it if you shared your ideas for more educational ideas for playing cards!

Here's a link to Step 4:

Keep Out a Few Decks of Playing Cards! This post includes a fun addition game resource to play with playing cards!




The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun!

Here's a game my students have been playing for years called The Greatest Sum! I've put it together with lots of variations!

 
The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun! This place value game practices adding 2-4 digit numbers (with or without regrouping) with many variations!

The basic game is played with two 2-digit numbers. The children choose one number square at a time, and decide where to place it on their boards. It takes them only a short time to figure out they should put the greater numbers in the tens column, and the lower numbers in the ones column. You can use the numbers included in this package, or you can use tiles, cubes, or other interesting manipulatives and write the numerals 0-9 on them, as I have done in these pictures.

The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun! This place value game practices adding 2-4 digit numbers (with or without regrouping) with many variations!

Here's how to play:

1. Place the tiles (or number squares) face down between 2 "Greatest Sum" boards.
 
2. The first player takes a tile and places it in one of the squares on his board. That player should think about which square might bring them the greatest sum, since he isn't allowed to move it once he lets go!
 
3. Play continues between the two players until all squares on both boards are filled.
 
4. Which player has the greatest sum? Players may use paper & pencil, whiteboards, number grids, a calculator, or mental math to determine each round's winner. (Teacher's choice!)

As you can see in this preview, there are plenty of variations to this game!

The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun! This place value game practices adding 2-4 digit numbers (with or without regrouping) with many variations!


Explore the image or explore this link: The Greatest Sum


Which player had the greatest sum?


The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun! This place value game practices adding 2-4 digit numbers (with or without regrouping) with many variations!The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun! This place value game practices adding 2-4 digit numbers (with or without regrouping) with many variations!
The Greatest Sum - an Addition Game with Strategy and Fun! This place value game practices adding 2-4 digit numbers (with or without regrouping) with many variations!


Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts

I've been fascinated by the brain for years now. I've read about how the brain works, and the best ways to help children learn. I've applied this knowledge to my teaching and have had fabulous results!

 Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
 These are some of the things I've learned about the brain!
 Let's see how they relate to learning Math Facts!

Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
   We know that “Practice Makes Perfect” is a fallacy since we know if a child practices something incorrectly, he learns it incorrectly.  Whatever they practice needs to be accurate so the child learns it correctly.  (I’m sure you know how hard it is to break a bad habit!)  When practicing facts, it's important that the child practices the correct answer. Either have the correct answer on the back of flashcards, or have the child practice with someone who knows the answers!

Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
    This goes with the first idea: the kiddos need to know if they're getting the answer correct. If they are not, they need to know right away so they will practice it correctly.


Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
   Brains are much more likely to remember something if the learner uses more than one process. If the children are looking at the fact, saying the fact out loud, and moving manipulatives on the tens frame, they are more likely to remember the information than if they just looked at it. Another idea, stating the fact while jumping on one foot, or while doing jumping jacks.

Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
    When children work together, they are keeping the brain happy. Social interaction is HUGE when it comes to learning! This is one reason why games are great for learning math facts!


Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
    A little healthy competition gets the blood moving, bringing oxygen to the brain and helping the memory do its thing. This is another reason why games are great for practicing facts!


Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
   When the kids practice facts, it's a good idea to put fact families together: 4+7=11   7+4=11   11-4=7   11-7=4   or  3x6=18  6x3=18  18÷6=3  18÷3=6 This really helps the kiddos make the connections in the brain!


Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
    If it's possible color code copies of facts by fact families.
The brain really focuses on color, and helps make those connections!



Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
   This is why it's not a good idea to give the kiddos too many facts to study at a time. Start with just a couple of families, and build from there!


Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
    It is suggested that children spend 5 minutes a day, every day, rather than a half-hour once a week. It's actually less time, but it's more productive!

Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!
     It is recommended that background music is played during practice times. This is a good time for a piece of classic music, not rock music or anything with lyrics. 

Hope this list helps your kiddos learn their facts!

This resource makes it clear just how many facts the children need to master!
Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!


It just so happens I have a set of addition and subtraction facts to practice that follow almost all these brain rules, (you have to supply your own music) and even has a few brain breaks worked in! See here if you're interested:  

Update: Due to popular demand and success with the above set of addition and subtraction facts, I'm made a new version to practice and assess multiplication and division, which you can find here:  

Ten Brain Tricks for Learning Math Facts: These strategies are backed by science, and will help the kiddos with basic math facts!

Do I Add or Subtract?

Brain research suggests adding movement with words in order to help the memory.

Do I Add or Subtract? This post includes some brain based ideas for adding movement and gestures to help children figure out whether to add and subtract when solving math story problems.
Many children struggle to remember when to add or subtract when they read math story problems. I decided to add some movement to help the kids remember when to add or subtract.

When we talk about an addition story, I have the children gesture one arm out and reference the first set. Then they gesture the second arm out and reference the second set. Then while we ask the question, we swoop our arms together into a plus sign, and say "How many all together?" or "How many in all?" The motion of bringing both arms together into a plus sign while saying the words really helps!

Do I Add or Subtract? This post includes some brain based ideas for adding movement and gestures to help children figure out whether to add and subtract when solving math story problems.
 
For subtraction, we start by gesturing a set in one arm. Then the second arm swoops away part of that set, making a minus sign with the arms.

Do I Add or Subtract? This post includes some brain based ideas for adding movement and gestures to help children figure out whether to add and subtract when solving math story problems.

Finally, for a subtraction comparison story, we gesture being a scale, balancing a set on each hand while saying, "How many more?" or "How many less?"

Do I Add or Subtract? This post includes some brain based ideas for adding movement and gestures to help children figure out whether to add and subtract when solving math story problems.

These gestures seem rather simple, yet with a few repetitions, the children remember them when they are doing word problems. In fact, I've had children come back to me long after they left my class and tell me how glad they are I taught them these gestures!

 It helps if you have fun math stories for the children to practice with. Here are a few themed math story problems to make the practice a little more fun!

 
Do I Add or Subtract? This post includes some brain based ideas for adding movement and gestures to help children figure out whether to add and subtract when solving math story problems.

Playing Math Games to Strengthen Important Skills

I find games to be a great way to learn and develop skills.


Brain research tells us that adding the element of fun helps to connect the memory. Isn't that a great reason to play learning games?

Playing Math Games to Strengthen Important Skills: This post tells why it's important to play math games, and has some suggestions on how to teach them and what to play!


I like to teach a game during small group instruction time, so I can watch the children play and make sure they are focused on the learning goal. I'll have them play a couple of times with guidance before I let them play on their own.

After a game has been introduced and practiced, it will be available as a choice during math stations or centers.  There are times when certain children are assigned a particular game as well.

It's a good idea to allow the children to play games below their level, as these are important skills that should be mastered in order to perform the higher skills with ease. Just because the skills are easy for the child doesn't mean they don't have value! In fact, if the game isn't somewhat easy, it won't be fun for the children. Also, if the game isn't somewhat easy, the children will be more likely to make mistakes, which won't help them master the skills. I've learned "practice makes permanent," and we don't want to make incorrect skills permanent, do we? If you've ever had to unlearn a bad habit, you'll know just what I mean!


I have a series of BINGO games that I designed to go along with second-grade skills. They all have a sports theme, which is a big draw for the kids. I find once they learn the format of a particular game, it takes less time to teach a similar game, meaning more time practicing each skill!
This post tells why it's important to play math games, and has some suggestions on how to teach them and what to play!


You can find this resource here:  Par 3 Adding 3 Addends

As mentioned above, once the students know the format and how the game works, they can play similar games to strengthen similar skills. It just so happens that I have several math games that follow this same format with different sports themes that can be found here:

Still looking for more math games to strengthen their skills?

Here are plenty more Math games, including several freebies! Math Games Category
 
Games are a great way to build skills AND have fun!  Enjoy!

Playing Math Games to Strengthen Important Skills: This post tells why it's important to play math games, and has some suggestions on how to teach them and what to play!

Learning Math Facts With Cuisenaire Rods

Brain Research tells us that being physically involved with the learning process helps learning happen. 

It also suggests that the use of color helps make connections. 

Teachers know that kids (and adults) tend to key into color, and children love to use manipulatives!

Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!

Almost everyone has a set of Cuisenaire Rods sitting in their closet. If not, here are a couple of Amazon affiliate links:

With Cuisenaire Rods (see picture) the white rod, the smallest, is one cubic centimeter. (This is the same size as a standard base ten block.) The longest rod is orange. When the children put the rods by length, they make a colorful "staircase". (See picture.)
 
Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!
The children can then assign values to each rod by color based on the relationship of the other rods.

I like to start with sets of ten, since our number system is based on ten.  It's good for them to know those combinations of ten!

Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!
Since the orange rod has a value of 10, this picture shows 9+1=10. It also shows 1+9=10.It also shows 10-1=9 as well as 10-9=1.

Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!
What fact family do these blocks show?  6+4=10, 4+6=10, 10-6=4, and 10-4=6.  

Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!

This one shows 6+6=12 and 12-6=6


Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas! 



 


The Cuisenaire Rods can also be used for multiple addends or even multiplication.  This could be 3+3+3+3=12 or 3x4=12.

When it comes to storage, the containers the rods come in are tricky for the kids to put away. I put my Cuisenaire Rods into containers that are much easier for little hands.

Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!


I made these center sheets for the students. I prefer the children work with partners on activities like this since their conversations help the learning.  If you run these off back to back, you can make two-sided, half-size papers.

Click the image or click here for the sample: Fact Families with Cuisenaire Rods Sample!

Explore this image for a link to this popular hands-on resource!


For more sheets like this, click here: Fact Families with Cuisenaire Rods

Explore this image for a link to this fun hands-on math resource!


I also have a resource to develop Number Sense with Cuisenaire Rods that can be found HERE.

Plus, here's a chance to build with the rods and add up the sums with multiple addends HERE. (This one is a favorite... they LOVE building with the rods!)
  • All the above resources can be found as a bundled set HERE.
  • For a more advanced bundle of place value activities using Cuisenaire Rods see: HERE.
  • Want to grab ALL these resources with Cuisenaire Rods? Save money with the bundle HERE.
Learning Math Facts with Cuisenaire Rods - Cuisenaire Rods are fun for the kids and helpful for learning valuable math concepts. Here are some ideas!
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