fbq('track', 'ViewContent');
Showing posts with label Myers-Briggs Personality Types. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Myers-Briggs Personality Types. Show all posts

Myers-Briggs Part 6: What's Your Type?

For the last 6 weeks I have posted once a week about my experiences with the Myers-Briggs Personality Types

 
This is something that helped me not only as a teacher, but as a person, learning about the world around me. 
 

Tonight, we're summing it up!


Myers-Briggs Part 6: What's Your Type?  This post is a summary of a 6 part series on the Myers-Briggs 16 personality types.
First, I told about my master's program and my first introduction to the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator. 

  Explore the image below for the link to that post:

 

The next week, I posted about the difference between Introverts (I) and Extr0verts (E). I even listed famous Introverts and famous Extroverts, and suggested possible careers for both. Of the four preferences, this is the one I personally struggled with the most. I've learned much more about it, and now I'm proud to be an Introvert. There are many successful Introverts in our world, including teachers! 
 

Explore the image below to get to the post about Introversion and Extroversion.



Next up was Sensing (S) vs Intuition (N). This one is quite important to us as teachers. People process information in different ways, and it's essential that we respect both preferences. Most teachers teach to their own preference, which leaves out many students. 
 

Explore the image below to read more about how people process information.



A week later, I posted about the third preference: How we make decisions. The two preferences are Feeling (F) and Thinking (T). 
 

Explore the image below to read about Thinkers and Feelers.



Finally, last week posted about how people live their outer life. That's Judging (J) or Perceiving (P). This was another area where I struggled, until I realized that Judging didn't mean Judgmental. It just means I prefer structure and order. Understanding who I am really helped me appreciate the Ps in my life! 
 

Explore the image below for more information about Judging and Perceiving.



Although I recommend taking the official Myers Briggs Instrument (See HERE for information.) However after some thought, you might have a guess on where you land on some of the preferences.  

There are a total of 16 different "types".  
Here they are! (See HERE or explore the image below.)



If you explore the image and go to the Myers Briggs website, there is a link for a description to each of these 16 personality types.

I'm an ISFJ. They call me The Nurturer. If you google ISFJ and read the  description, you'll see a perfect description of me. It's almost as if someone who knew me very well wrote a detailed description of my personality.

Here's a summary of my type: ISFJ

and a more detailed summary here: ISFJ

What's your type?


Myers-Briggs Part 6: What's Your Type?  This post is a summary of a 6 part series on the Myers-Briggs 16 personality types.

Myers-Briggs Part 5: How Do You Live Your Outer Life?

The fourth and final scale that's part of the Myers-Briggs Personality Types deals with how people live their "outer life".   

Myers-Briggs Part 5: How do you live your outer life? The 5th in a series, this post explores personality types, and how people live their outer lives - spontaneous or organized, or somewhere in between.


There are two sides to this scale:

  • Judging types prefer organization and planning.  
  • Perceiving types like to improvise and explore options.
  • Judging types value punctuality and completeness of tasks. 
  • Perceiving types value spontaneity and flexibility.
  • Judging types prefer decisions made. They are task oriented and love to make lists.
  • Perceiving types prefer to multitask. They mix work with play, and love variety.
  • Judging types can be accused of being "too structured".
  • Perceiving types can be accused of being "too loosey goosey."

As I've mentioned in previous posts about Myers-Briggs, there is no right or wrong preference. We need both types in our world.  

Please don't confuse Judging types with the term "judgmental". They are not related.  

I'm a Judging type. I keep all my school supplies organized by the month I use them. I have tubs of activities for each month of the year.  All the clothes in my closet are in order by color. I have all the tops in hanging in one section, facing the same way, of course, starting with red, and going through the rainbow. Black and brown come at the end. The bottoms are on the other side of the closet. In color order, of course. All the money in my wallet is in order of denomination, all facing the same way.

I realized very early that my daughter was also a judging type when she lined up all her dolls around her by height. (She did this all the time, it was scary!)

Once a friend of mine told me I needed to be more spontaneous. I told him I'd put it in my plans.  

Of all four scales of the Myers-Briggs, this is one scale where I'm nowhere near the middle. I'm a strong "J".  

However, understanding personality types has helped me from becoming too extreme. I no longer panic if I don't know what's coming up. I'm ok if plans have to be changed.  

One of the things I appreciate most about understanding the different personality types is that I've learned to be tolerant and appreciative of the other types.  

I know and enjoy people who are Perceiving types. I admire spontaneity. I appreciate those who are good at improvising.  

For more information on the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator, click the links below.



Have you figured out your own type?


Myers-Briggs Part 5: How do you live your outer life? The 5th in a series, this post explores personality types, and how people live their outer lives - spontaneous or organized, or somewhere in between.

Myers-Briggs Part 4: How Do You Make Decisions?

It's time for another installment of my series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. Today we'll discuss how people make their decisions.

Myers-Briggs Part 4: How do you make decisions? The 4th in a series, this post discusses personality types and how people make decisions.

According to Myers-Briggs, there are two ways people make their decisions:

Thinking people make decisions based on fact. They are logical, objective, and driven by thought. They do the "right thing" whether or not it is liked. They have been known to enjoy a debate. Thinking types are sometimes seen as uncaring or indifferent.

Feeling people make decisions based on their hearts. They care about how people feel, and want to keep people happy. They are passionate and driven by emotion. They avoid conflict. Feeling types are sometimes seen as too idealistic or too sensitive.

As I've mentioned on discussion of previous scales, all people have parts of both sides. Most decisions are made with a combination of both Thinking and Feeling characteristics. However, we all have a preference.

Here are some interesting statistics:

  • Of the Thinkers, about 65% are men.
  • Of the Feelers, 75% are women.

Be sure to check out these other posts on the Myers Briggs Personality Types:


 Myers-Briggs Part 4: How do you make decisions? The 4th in a series, this post discusses personality types and how people make decisions.

Myers-Briggs Part 3 : How Do You Process Information?

I hope you have been enjoying my series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types as much as I have!  

If you haven't seen the other posts yet, you can read Part I: the Introduction HERE. You can read Part 2:  How do you find your energy HERE.

Myers-Briggs Part 3: How do you process information? This, the 3rd in a series, discusses the two ways in which people take in information. Some take in details, others are "whole picture" people.


A couple of very important points to remember about Myers-Briggs:
  1. Each preference is a scale. People tend to lean toward one side or the other, the place where they are naturally more comfortable. We do, however, have parts of both sides within us.  
  2. Both sides of each scale are essential in our society. No one preference is better than the other. Both sides keep each other in balance. Since I learned to recognize the qualities of each side of each scale, I have learned to cherish the differences in people, and appreciate those who don't have the same preferences as myself. 
Today I wanted to share one of the aspects of Myers-Briggs that's very important to teachers: How do we take in information?  

There are two ends to this scale.

Sensing Types (S) take information through their senses.
  • They are about the "here and now" and are concerned with facts.  
  • They are very aware of things in their immediate environment. 
  • They organize,  categorize, and focus on reality.  
  • These people are practical and all about the details.  
  • Sensing types prefer to learn in a sequenced, step by step progression. 
  • Interestingly, Sensing types make up about 75% of the population.
 

Intuitive Types (N) are about the future and possibilities.
  • They are imaginative, inventive, and idealistic. 
  • They see the big picture before the facts and details.
  • Intuitive types often jump from topic to topic.
  • About 25% of our learners are Intuitives.  
  • The Intuitive Types are the forest, and the Sensing Types are the trees. Sensing types would see the trees, but not the forest, Intuitive Types see the forest, but not the trees. 

I still remember an experiment we did in my master's program where we studied the different types. All the Sensing types sat on one side of the room, while the Intuitives sat on the other side. We were shown a poster and directed to write down what we see while we looked at the poster.

The poster had something to do with music.

 After some time, we shared what we had. We Sensing types proudly shared all the details about the poster we had scribbled.  We did most of the sharing for a while. Then one of the Intuitives spoke up about something we never noticed: the poster was in the shape of a grand piano. All the sensing types stopped and looked at each other: none of us had noticed that! We all had to see the poster again, and sure enough, it was in the shape of a grand piano. We were so focused on the details, we missed the big picture!  (Literally!)


Have you been thinking about your own type? How about your students?


Here are a few more books if you'd like to learn more!  The first one (People Types and Tiger Stripes) is one of the first books I've read on the Myers-Briggs personality types, and it's still one of my favorites.  This is the revised version.


Myers-Briggs Part 3: How do you process information? This, the 3rd in a series, discusses the two ways in which people take in information. Some take in details, others are "whole picture" people.Myers-Briggs Part 3: How do you process information? This, the 3rd in a series, discusses the two ways in which people take in information. Some take in details, others are "whole picture" people. Myers-Briggs Part 3: How do you process information? This, the 3rd in a series, discusses the two ways in which people take in information. Some take in details, others are "whole picture" people.             
Here are links to the other posts about the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator



 Myers-Briggs Part 3: How do you process information? This, the 3rd in a series, discusses the two ways in which people take in information. Some take in details, others are "whole picture" people.



Myers-Briggs Part 2: How Do You Find Your Energy?

Last week I posted about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. (See THIS post.) 


Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy -Introversion or Extraversion?

This week I want to tell more about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. As I mentioned last time, there are four "scales". Today's scale asks how you find your energy.  

There are two ways people get their energy:  

1.  They get their energy from other people. (Extroversion)
2.  They get their energy by turning inward. (Introversion)

When I originally took the test, I really struggled over this one. I thought being an introvert meant I was anti-people. I thought it meant I was doomed to be alone, and I really questioned the accuracy of this scale. After all, I like people! I have a lot of great friends!

To some people, being an introvert can mean "terribly shy" or "prefers to be alone".  

For the Myers-Briggs scale, it doesn't mean that at all.  
  • Introverts prefer small groups of people to large groups.
  • Extroverts prefer large groups of people to small groups.
  • Introverts "recharge" by spending time alone.
  • Extroverts "recharge" by surrounding themselves with friends.
  • Introverts think, then act.
  • Extroverts act, then think.
  • Introverts are very reflective.  
  • Extroverts are very social.
  • Introverts feel drained after a social get together, even if they had fun.
  • Extroverts feel energized after a social get together.
  • When extroverts get together, they all talk at once.
  • When introverts get together, they take turns and speak one at a time
These last two comments remind me of the two staff rooms in my school, and the groups of people who have lunch in each room. Being an introvert, I go to the "quieter" staff room for lunch. It's a smaller group, and there is one conversation going on in the room. We all take turns and listen to each other. The other staff room has several conversations going on at once.They are clearly having a great time in there, but I can honestly say, the days I've gone in there, I was so drained I could barely go back to my classroom and face the afternoon with the kids! That's just not how I "regroup"!

I think what I've learned most about personality types is that our society needs all types. I've learned to value who I am and appreciate the other types. I've come to recognize the different types in other adults as well as the students I work with. Life would be boring if we were all the same! 


Some famous introverts:  Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Theresa, George Washington, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Julia Roberts, Audrey Hepburn, Johnny Carson, J.K.Rowling, Mozart, Steven Spielberg 

Some famous extroverts:  Oprah, Martin Luther King, Ben Franklin, Winston Churchill, Andrew Carnegie, Margaret Thatcher, John Kennedy, Bill Gates, Aristotle, Mark Twain, Anne Frank, Ronald Reagan

Great jobs for introverts: Accountant, Software Engineer, Market Research Analyst, Graphic Designer, Translator, Writer, Fine Arts, Designer, Chef, Scientist, Editor, Mechanic, Truck Driver, Lawyer, Teacher

Great jobs for extroverts: Emergency Medical Technician, Dental Hygienist, Physical Therapist, Public Relations Manager, Human Resource Specialist, Sports coach, Event planner, Corporate Fund Raiser, Hairdresser, Customer Service, Nurse, Financial Advisor, Teacher

Check out these book recommendations by exploring the images. (These are affiliate links,) Type Talk is the one I bought when I first learned about Myers Briggs Personality Types, and it has helped me understand people in all parts of my life.  


The second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy Introversion or Extroversion?     The second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy Introversion or Extroversion?     The second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy Introversion or Extroversion?
           

Here are links to all my posts on the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator:



Myers-Briggs Part 2: How Do You Find Your Energy - the second part of a series on the Myers-Briggs Personality Types. This part focuses on how people find their energy -Introversion or Extroversion?



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Format