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Showing posts with label Independent Reading. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Independent Reading. Show all posts

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom

 In the mid 1980s I took the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality test and found out I was an ISFJ.

That stands for: Introverted/ Sensing/ Feeling/ Judging. 

That's my personality type. It took me a while, but after a lot of research, I grew to understand and appreciate what it all means, and who I am.

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

The part I struggled with the most? The introverted part. I guess I just didn't understand what an introvert is. I knew I enjoyed my time with people, so I must be an extrovert, right?

Then I realized I was stuck on myths and didn't quite understand what those words meant.  

 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Here Are Some MYTHS About Introverts:

  • Introverts are shy.
  • Introverts want to be alone.
  • Introverts are anti-social.
  • Introverts are quiet.
  • Introverts don't take risks.
  • Introverts don't like fun.
  • Introverts are hard to get to know.

Here Are Some MYTHS About Extroverts:

(Note: Sometimes this is spelled extravert. Either spelling is acceptable.)
  • Extroverts love to talk.
  • Extroverts are happier than introverts.
  • Extroverts are more confident.
  • Extroverts don't listen.
  • Extroverts are loud.
  • Extroverts are "attention hogs."
  • Extroverts are the "life of the party."
  • Extroverts don't experience anxiety.
  • Extroverts never need "alone time" 
  • Extroverts are easy to get to know 
There is some truth to most of these statements about introverts and extroverts, but there is a whole lot more to these stories!
 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Here Are Some TRUTHS About Introverts:

  • Introverts are quickly drained by social interaction.
  • Introverts enjoy alone time.
  • Introverts are good listeners.
  • Introverts are reflective.
  • Introverts are observers.
  • Introverts prefer small groups or one-on-one to large groups 
  • Introverts prefer to think things through before talking or acting.
  • Introverts take longer to make decisions.
  • Introverts like time with friends, but prefer to do it on own terms.
  • Introverts experience anxiety about making phone calls.
  • Introverts prefer to write rather than talk.
  • Introverts have difficulty with multitasking and adjusting to a constantly changing environment.
  • Introverts need quiet to concentrate.
  • Introverts can be perceived as "stand-offish" or even "snobby,"
  • Introverts don't like being the center of attention, but don't want to be ignored.

Here Are Some TRUTHS About Extroverts

  • Extroverts don't mind being the center of attention, and often love it.
  • Extroverts take well to networking.
  • Extroverts show feelings easily.
  • Extroverts love to talk.
  • Extroverts prefer to talk through problems.
  • Extroverts make quick decisions.
  • Extroverts prefer to work with background noise.
  • Extroverts get bored when alone for long periods.
  • Extroverts acts before thinking.
  • Extroverts feel energized and inspired by socializing.

 Now Here's One BIG Truth About Introverts and Extroverts:

 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

It's a scale! No one is completely introverted or completely extroverted!

We all draw from both sides!

Sometimes people use the term "ambiverts" for people who fall near the middle of the scale. I prefer not to use that term because pretty much everyone shows indicators of both preferences at some point. However, most people lean more toward one preference or the other.

Here's a quote from THIS article that explains it well:

"Extroversion and introversion refer to where people receive energy from. Extroverts are energized by socializing in larger groups of people, having many friends, instead of a few intimate ones while introverts are energized by spending time alone or with a smaller group of friends

The big takeaway: It’s not how you act but what situations you thrive in and get energy from." 

 

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Well-Known Introverts

  • Bill Gates
  • Mark Zuckerberg
  • J.K. Rowling
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Meryl Streep
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Emma Watson
  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • Elton John
  • Lady Gaga
  • Audrey Hepburn
  • Albert Einstein
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
 Well-Known Extroverts
  • Oprah
  • Tom Hanks
  • Steve Jobs
  • Bill Clinton
  • Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Jim Carrey
  • Madonna
  • Winston Churchill
  • Ben Franklin
  • Beyonce 
 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Believe it or not, I recently read this information (in THIS article) that shows a significant difference in how brains react.

"Introvert brains react differently to dopamine than extrovert brains do. That's a chemical that turns on the reward- and pleasure-seeking part of your brain. Introverts and extroverts have the same amount of the chemical, but extrovert brains get an excited buzz from their reward center. Introverts, on the other hand, tend to just feel run-down by it."

I've been studying this stuff since the 80s, and this really explains WHY we have these personality differences! We're chemically different!

I suspect by now you've thought about which side of the scale you fall upon, as well as your students. One thing to be careful about: when introverts are comfortable with someone, they'll become quite chatty! Don't let that lead you to believe they're extroverted! (Many people have confused me with being an extrovert because I become passionate about certain things, like brain research, and won't stop talking about it!) 

There are plenty of introverts as well as extroverts in your classroom. (Studies show it's close to 50-50.) It's impossible to cater to all their needs, all the time. (Nor is it in their best interest.) But here are some suggestions for supporting each preference and helping them be successful in your classroom.

 

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Suggestions to Support the Introverts in Your Classroom:

  • Make sure there are "quiet" times in your classroom.
  • Give them time to think before they are expected to talk.
  • Know their interests and passions and encourage these.
  • Be sure to have one-on-one time with these students.
  • Post a daily schedule and stick to a routine so they'll know what's coming up.
  • Do "Reader's Theater" or a class play. (Believe it or not, many introverts shine with these genres!)
  • Make sure there are places where they can be by themselves. (nooks and crannies)
  • Help them work to develop friendships. (This is very difficult for introverts!)
  • Use notes or email for communication.
  • Remember, introverts get lonely, too! Make sure they have interactions with others and an opportunity to bond with classmates. Just keep it on a small scale!

 

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs

Suggestions to Support the Extroverts in Your Classroom:

In general, most classrooms are designed for extroverts. (Just look at the amount of students in the room!)
  • Give them plenty of opportunities to talk.
  • Let them "call out" sometimes, without require raising hands.
  • Give choices: work alone, with a partner, with a group.
  • Give choices: oral report, written report.
  • Allow for group discussions on what they're learning and books they've read.
  • Be flexible with the schedule.
  • Embrace them. 
 
Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs
 

Suggestions to Support the All Students in Your Classroom:

  • Share information about introversion and extroversion and help them understand who they are. Make sure they know they are an important part of the classroom!
  • Include Morning Meeting in your day, and make it clear that this is a safe place.
  • Be a role model, verbalizing your respect for the differences in students. Show that you celebrate those differences. 
  • When setting up your classroom, include areas for large groups, small groups, and individuals. Let children use them all.
  • Give choices: work alone, with a partner, with a group.
  • Give choices: oral report, written report.
  • Give choices: read with a partner, read alone. 
  • Touch base with all students daily, whether it be a group conversation, a one-on-one conversation, or just a quick not. They all need you.
  • Don't hesitate to challenge them by going out of their comfort zone, but only a bit. (We don't want to traumatize them!)
  • Embrace them for who they are. Celebrate who they are. Enjoy who they are. 

Years ago, I did a series of posts about the Myers-Briggs Personality Types, which I learned about during my Masters program. Here's a post about Introversion and Extroversion:

Myers-Briggs Part 2: How Do You Find Your Energy?

 
The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator Part 2: How do you find your energy?

When I grew to truly understand what an introvert is, I grew to be proud of who I am. Unfortunately, this didn't happen until I was in my 30s. Hopefully, our children will learn who they are an appreciate themselves at a much younger age!

 

The Final Lesson:

All types need each other! 

 

Introverts become artists, writers, architects, librarians, psychologists, scientists, chefs, ITs, journalists, and accountants. 

 
Extroverts become managers, real estate agents, lawyers, politicians, salespeople, managers, event planners, nurses, life coaches, and human relations specialists.

Don't we need ALL these people? Of course, since most people fall closer to the middle of both preferences, our children really can be anything we want to be!

And I've known many, many teachers who fall under both preferences who are highly successful!

Introverts vs Extroverts in the Classroom: This post shares information about both personality types, and suggests ways teachers can meet their needs


Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!

Here in the northern hemisphere, we are enjoying the spring weather!

Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.


We still have to teach. but we might as well teach while enjoying the beautiful weather and getting those kiddos outside! Here are some of my ideas!

Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.

This one is pretty obvious! They have to read every day.  Why not bring it outside? If you want to go all out, have them bring in towels to sit or lie on while reading. Other options: partner reading, or teacher read alouds!

I do find sometimes a little bribery motivation is necessary. "If you don't stay focused on your books, we will have to bring them back inside."

Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.

There are loads of engineering projects that can be done outside!  Children can use sand, grass, rocks or sticks to create all sorts of things! Here are a few ideas:

1. Create a sundial.
2. Make a tall rock tower.
3. Make a shadow creature.
4. Take tubs of water outside and maybe a few classroom materials to create "boats" that float!

This is only the beginning. If you search "Outdoor S.T.E.M." on Pinterest or google it, I'll bet you find a TON of ideas!

Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.

You'll need some sidewalk chalk for this. 


Have equal teams, and a list of math facts or math problems they can solve. 


One team member at a time takes the chalk, runs to the other end of the defined area, write the problem with the correct answer, and run back. (It's a good idea to have another adult at the other end to check their math!) 

When they get back, the next person gets the chalk and a new problem.


I suggest making the running area on grass or "soft top," and the writing area on the hard top.

They'll be so busy having fun and burning off steam, they won't even know they're practicing important facts!


Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.

Sketching is an important science skill!


Scientists need to notice details, and look for differences!


Direct students to pick a specific spot to sketch. (One with some sort of vegetation is best!)  A week later, they can go back to the same spot. As they re-sketch, hopefully they will notice differences.

Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.
3 Seasons of our class tree!
Notice the winter tree was photographed from inside the screened window!

I've had my groups choose a "class tree" in the fall, and we will often go out to sketch the tree. As the year progresses, they re-sketch, and definitely notice differences!
One little secret, I've been very good at convincing the children to choose the tree right outside our class window. That way, they can sketch from inside in the winter! (No one wants to sit in snow and sketch!)


Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.

Just like reading, story writing can be brought outdoors easily! They can continue stories they were working on, make up a story about what they see, or write nature poetry. Again, reminding the children this is a privilege helps them stay focused!


If you're interested in a little outdoor Science or Social Studies with reading and writing skills thrown in, check out this: Science and Social Studies for Summer

Most of these activities are designed for the outdoors, and you definitely don't have to wait for summer!

Five Ways to Get Them Learning OUTSIDE!  There's something special about being outside, and it's a great place to practice important skills.

Relax and Read!

For most of us, one of our goals as teachers is to instill a love of reading. I find much of that is in the way it's presented! I never tell my students they "have to" read. I never, ever let it sound like a chore. I tell them it's time to...
 
Relax and Read: Here's a simple suggestion that could help your students learn to love reading. It's all in the approach!

Independent Reading time in my classroom is pretty special. I have a collection of pillows that I ONLY allow to be used during independent reading time.
Relax and Read: Here's a simple suggestion that could help your students learn to love reading. It's all in the approach!

Plus, I make sure there are plenty of good books available for the kiddos. They typically go to the school library once a week, and I have loads of great books in the classroom as well.

Although I typically insist on their reading "Just Right Books", I make an exception on Fridays... they can read an "Easy Sneezy" book. Who doesn't love revisiting an old friend? This is the "summer beach read" for the kids.
Relax and Read: Here's a simple suggestion that could help your students learn to love reading. It's all in the approach!

One more thing I do to instill a love of reading: model a love of reading!

Much of this comes from my read alouds, which is my favorite part of the day! Read alouds are a great time to model many reading skills, but modeling that love of reading is at the top of the list.

I choose books for my read alouds that are worthy of loving... books I've loved in the past, books I know children enjoy, topics I know the children enjoy, and authors we love. 

I've actually been known to pick up a book and caress the cover.  Ok, maybe it's a little bit of overacting, but it really isn't. 

I really do love these books!


And I make sure the kids know it!


Hope you find some time to Relax and Read!

Relax and Read: Here's a simple suggestion that could help your students learn to love reading. It's all in the approach!

A Quick Exit Slip Procedure

My students have Independent Reading time daily. I try to make it a special time for the kiddos by letting them choose a cozy spot and giving them a comfy pillow. I also make sure I have plenty of fun books. It is often their favorite time of the day!
Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

But reading really is pretty important, and I have a fun, quick way for the children respond to their books. Are you ready for a bright idea? 


Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

Although I have several strategies for checking for understanding in response to Independent Reading time, this is a quick one I use often. It doesn't replace the need for deep book conversations or detailed Book Reviews. It's just a quick response.

It starts with a Post It.

Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

My kiddos each have a Post it pad in their book boxes just for this purpose! Many kids struggle using Post its, so I make it as easy as possible for them.
 
Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

I replace the backing with a red square as a reminder: don't use that side. (It also helps them find their own!)

I have them write on the Post it while it's still on the pad. (To avoid them writing on the sticky side!)

What they write depends on the prompt. I'll ask them a variety of questions, depending on what we're studying. 

  • They might draw the setting. 
  • They might write 3 adjectives to describe the main character. 
  • They might write a general statement about the story. 
  • They could be asked about the Author's purpose. 


I'm sure you can think of many more responses that would fit on a Post it!

Sometimes I tell them the topic before we read. 
Sometimes I don't tell them until after we read. 

Here comes the really easy part:

 

Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

They just put the post it on their class number!


That's it! I've had these same charts for years, and I just keep using them for exit slips! It's easy to see who wrote what, and who hasn't responded yet!

Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

Sometimes I have the children share with the whole class what they wrote. Sometimes I have them share with a small group, and sometimes they don't share at all!

It's quick and easy, and there are plenty of possibilities.


How do you assess Independent Reading?


Looking for a quick way to assess what the children are reading? This post suggests a very simple exit slip procedure using post its!

Organizing Literacy Centers

I work with 2 of my 3 reading groups daily. What do I do with my other students?

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!


Many teachers use the Daily 5, and have some great ways to organize the 5 choices.

My district has some specific guidelines on how we spend our reading time, but we can be flexible within those guidelines.

Every child must have Independent Reading daily.  That's easy! Reading groups need to meet so many times per week, with the lowest group meeting daily.

I use little cards with magnets on the back. At the beginning of the year, I teach the children the meaning of each card, and introduce them one at a time. We start with Independent Reading, then move on to the others.

Some people call these Centers, or Learning Centers. I call them Stations. I don't know why!


I have a section of my whiteboard in the front of the room that's always about literacy stations. On some days, it might look like this:

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

The children know that the first row of cards tells where the children go for the first station.  In my classroom, instead of "Group 1, Group2, and Group 3", I have the children's individual names on magnets.  I do change my groups often, depending on the needs of my students.  
I also have one child starred per group, per day. The starred child is in charge of handing out pillows for Independent Reading.  (I try to make this time as special as possible... who doesn't love curling up with a comfy pillow and a good book?)
In the above picture, for the first station, I'm working with Group 1, while Group 2 does word work, and Group 3 has Independent Reading. After a while, I switch the groups, and I'll have 2 groups at Independent Reading while I work with the third group.

Or it might look something like this.

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!
In the red example, I work with Group 1, while Group 2 has Independent Reading.  Group 3 has their reading time at the Library. Later, I work with Group 3, while Group 2 has Independent Reading and Group 2 works at assigned computer activities.

On a day where I have to work with individuals, it might look like this, where I only teach one reading group.

How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

For the first station, I work with Group 2 while Group 1 has Partner Reading and Group 3 has Independent Reading.  Later, I have 2 groups at Independent Reading and Group 3 has a written reading assignment. This is the time I would pull individuals for reading or writing conferences.

Here's a little freebie with some of the cards I use:
Literacy Center Cards Freebie
 
How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

If you like this freebie, you might enjoy this full set of Guided Reading Management

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Guided-Reading-and-Literacy-Center-Management-Resources-1988356?utm_source=reading%20centers%20blog%20post&utm_campaign=literacy%20center%20management%20system

How do you organize your students for reading?


How do you organize your Literacy Centers? This post gives you ideas for organizing what the children do when you're teaching a group. Plus, there's a freebie!

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