Monday, April 8, 2013

The Greatest Sum

Math gameHere's a game I've been playing for years called The Greatest Sum!  I finally decided to put it together as a package with loads of variations!

It's simply adding.  The basic game is played with two 2 digit numbers.  The children choose one number square at a time, then decide where to put it on their board.  It doesn't take long for the students to realize they should put the greater numbers in the tens column, and the lower numbers in the ones column.  


You can use the digits included with the package or you can use tiles, cubes or other interesting manipulatives and write the digits 0- 9 right on them, like I have done in the pictures.


Here's how to play: 

For 2 digit addition:
1.     Place squares for digits 0 – 9 face down between 2 Greatest Sum boards.
2.  The first player chooses a square randomly and
places it in one of the four squares.  They should think about which spot will help them achieve the
greatest sum.
3.  Players continue to choose squares until all 4 squares are placed.   
4. Which player has the greatest sum?  Players may use paper and pencil or white boards, manipulatives, number grids, a calculator, or mental math to figure out each winner!  (Teacher’s choice!)
    
For 3 digit addition:
Play as for 2 digit addition, but use 3 digit boards and 2 sets of numbers 0 – 9.
For 4 digit addition:
Play as for 2 digit addition, but use 4 digit boards and 2 sets of numbers 0 – 9.
For 3 Players:
Make extra boards, and adjust the amount of number squares as needed.
For an Easier Game:
Use the 2 digit boards.  Start with a zero in one of the digits in the ones column, so regrouping won’t be needed.
For Multiple Addends:
Run off as many boards as needed, and adjust the number of number tiles needed.
Example:  Three addends of 3 digit numbers will require 9 number squares per player, so 3 sets of numbers will be needed for 3 players.  (Each set of numbers squares has ten squares 0 – 9)
Example:  Three addends of 4 digit numbers will require 12 number squares per player, so 4 sets of numbers will be needed for 3 players. 



This Game supports these Common Core Standards: 
CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.C.4 Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.
·         CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.6 Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.         
·         CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.7 Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.  
·         CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.   
·         CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.4 Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
Want to give it a try? Try the freebie version HERE.
Which player had the greatest sum?

1 comment:

  1. Hi Sally,
    This is a great game that is so easy to adapt to your learner's needs. I love to use dice to play it because I have a collection of dice that allows me to vary the numbers I give to each group of students. I actually use this game right up through grade 6 by changing it to adding decimals, fractions and integers (one at a time!)

    Thanks for sharing.
    Love your blog!
    Tara
    The Math Maniac

    ReplyDelete

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